Training & Coaching


Training and Coaching Often forgotten imperative in Robert’s Rules of Innovation is TRAINING AND COACHING. Proper training and coaching in the new product development process is essential and the way to creative, reinforce and enhanced company culture and mindset. Effective training and coaching is one of the pillars of success to any sustainable Innovation program. Robert’s Rules of Innovation, the book, has more tips on training and coaching.

Creating a Structured, Repeatable Process For Innovation

Established companies do not easily reinvent themselves.  History shows us that Innovation is often the strategy of startups – but not only is it important in getting to the top, innovation is necessary in order to stay on top. New talent, new techniques, and new products are all needed to stay abreast of the competition. In addition, having a champion within the organization is imperative. Innovation executives are often the facilitator of change, and the leaders responsible for the development of corporate innovation culture.

Recently McKinsey Quarterly published an article entitled, “The eight essentials of innovation,” by Marc de Jong, Nathan Marston, and Erik Roth. The article highlights a set of eight essential attributes from a survey of 300 companies that are present (either in part or in full) at every large company considered a high performer in product, process, or business-model innovation. The first four essentials help build the foundation for innovation. They are: Aspire, Choose, Discover, and Evolve. The next four ensure that innovation is not only successful, but repeatable as well. They are: Accelerate, Extend, Scale, and Mobilize.

The following is a quick summary of the first four attributes, with insight from the 10 imperatives laid out in “Robert’s Rules of Innovation”. You can read the full article published by McKinsey Here.

Whether it’s 8 essentials or 10 imperatives; having a structured and repeatable process from start to finish helps to ensure innovation is not only successful, it is repeatable and sustainable.

 

Aspire: According to De Jong, Marston, and Roth, “A far-reaching vision can be a compelling catalyst, provided it’s realistic enough to stimulate action today.”

Innovation and ideation is pointless without buy-in and support from top management, usually the CEO, who should acts as the chief innovation officer (CINO). As Robert Safian, editor of Fast Company says, “Inspiration Needs Execution”.  Define innovation so the entire organization is moving in the same direction. Quantify your goal, whether it’s a sales figure or number of new products you hope to achieve, and this will help justify the resources to be allocated.

 

Choose: “Since no one knows exactly where valuable innovations will emerge, and searching everywhere is impractical, executives must create some boundary conditions for the opportunity spaces they want to explore.”

While creativity and ideas can be found in numerous places and in numerous ways, how you manage them determines the viability of a product or process. Ideation should be harnessed by a process with dedicated resources, and with NPD and LTD teams working together.

 

Discover: “The insight-discovery process, which extends beyond a company’s boundaries to include insight-generating partnerships, is the lifeblood of innovation.”

Keep an eye on new technologies as they come along, but at the same time, you must be aware of your customer’s wants and needs. It isn’t enough to tell your customer what they want, sometimes you have to listen too.

 

Evolve: “Business-model innovations—which change the economics of the value chain, diversify profit streams, and/or modify delivery models—have always been a vital part of a strong innovation portfolio.”

According to Doblin’s “Ten Types of Innovation”, creating new products is only one way to innovate – and on its own, it provides the lowest return on investment and the least competitive advantage.

 

Accelerate: “There’s a balance to be maintained: bureaucracy must be held in check, yet the rush to market should not undermine the cross-functional collaboration, continuous learning cycles, and clear decision pathways that help enable innovation.” As the authors relay, Innovation must have the ability to move through an organization in a way that creates and maintains competitive advantage, without exposing a company to unnecessary risk.

Suffice to say that companies are not naturally inclined to try new approaches without clear evidence that those approaches are likely to work. However, without risk, there can be no innovation. An effective innovation leader should encourage well-reasoned creativity and risk taking, while also practicing tolerance for failure. Fail fast and fail cheap, the saying goes. In 2014 Amazon’s innovation efforts fell short; and sure, Fast Company might have put them in the penalty box, leaving them off the list of “the 50 most innovative companies in 2015″ – but Amazon’s place in the market is all but guarunteed. In fact, even with the kerfuffle, Amazon and CEO Jeff Bezos are still a force to be reckoned with.

 

How would you answer the following questions in McKinsey’s Survey?

SurveyQ

 

For more in-depth guidelines on how to promote innovation in your business, refer to Robert’s Rules of Innovation. Be sure to keep an eye out for the forthcoming Robert’s Rules of Innovation II, “The Art of Implementation.” 

Exponential Leadership and Innovation

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“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” 

While there is no hard evidence to attribute the above quote to Henry Ford, there is no argument that he was a visionary of his time. He created something that consumers didn’t realize they needed, by making the automobile affordable. He disrupted the current model, and for a time monopolized market share.

No matter the origin of the above statement, business leaders of today are in a race against the clock to innovate faster than their competitors. Innovate or die, the adage goes. As I have mentioned before, there are some that suggest disruptive innovation is a competitive strategy for an “age seized by terror”. My response remains the same. Disruptive innovation is an argument against complacency, made more relevant by a landscape transformed by technology.

In late January, Big Think and Singularity University surveyed 1,283 US based executives about practices related to disruptive innovation. Using questions based on recent research in the field, respondents were asked to identify best practices for disruptive innovation, name a range of companies and leaders excelling these practices, and acknowledge which leadership traits & technologies have the most potential to disrupt businesses in the next five years.

The study is incredibly insightful and reflective, and is a must read for all executives doing business in today’s rapidly changing technological world.

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Nearly every attempt at success is met with failures along the way, and properly managing those failures can actually benefit the Innovation process. Failure, therefore, must be tolerated.  Without that freedom to fail, your team’s collective courage to push the status quo will quickly evaporate and freeze your innovation efforts. So: “Fail fast and fail cheap.” Don’t get me wrong; striving for perfection, maintaining the highest of standards, and planning for the future are all very important. At the same time, don’t let the fear of failure immobilize your business either. As Andrew Stanton, Director of Finding Nemo puts it, “We’re gonna screw up, let’s just admit that. Let’s not be afraid of that.”

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Another section of the study supports that organizations are executing important disruptive innovation practices, but need to embrace more data and external resources.

The term “Big Data” is nothing new – however, our ability to collect and use this data is growing at an exponential rate. Brands that seek to make deep connnections with their consumers, aim to make these connections personal, and personalization requires rich insights into individual needs, preferences and motivations. As Bob Zurek SVP of Products for Epsilon has pointed out, universities and colleges are starting to develop programs around big data, signifying a new crop of big data pioneers about to enter the workforce to help organizations harness the power of this information. “Big Data” isn’t limited to impacting customer relationships either. It can impact product development, operations, supply, and many other facets of your business.

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“Among more established companies, respondents favored leaders who engaged in media and took big bets. Eight of the 10 most cited CEOs creating disruptive innovation had some involvement in media businesses even if their core business model lay elsewhere.”

Leaders must involve their entire organization in the vision of their company, and promote an honest and open climate to achieve a meaningful shared vision of the future. While disruption in innovation is needed, it is impossible to achieve without the right leadership. The leader of your innovation team has to inspire, lead, and drive the process.

How are you preparing for innovation and business model disruption?

 

To get results in Innovation, a structured, repeatable process is essential from start to finish. Look to all the imperatives of Robert’s Rules of Innovation – but be sure you know how to implement them. Keep an eye out for Robert’s Rules of Innovation, volume II, coming soon!

The Exponential Leadership Survey 2015 was executed by Big Think and Singularity University.

Learn more Here.

 

IT’S ABOUT THEM: LEADING FOR INNOVATION

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Great leaders blaze new trails, inspire new ways of thinking, and lead their organizations with purpose. In order for any company to meet its goals and to achieve sustainable Innovation, leaders need to inspire their teams, top to bottom, and bottom up. They must involve their entire organization in the vision, and promote an honest and open climate to achieve a meaningful shared vision of the future. While it may be easy to focus the lens inward, leadership is never about you… it is about them. The people you lead, and the teams who put their trust in your tenure.

 

One person I have always looked up to is Danny Meyer. Meyer leads his hospitality teams with constant, gentle, pressure. He learned early on that leadership is not about being in control. His role as a leader was not to become frustrated with his staff when they failed to execute his vision perfectly, but instead to lead with consistency, purpose, and vision.

 “It’s my job, and consequently the job of every other leader in my company, to teach everyone who works for us to distinguish center from off center and always to set things right. I send my managers an unequivocal message: I’m going to be extremely specific as to where every component on that tabletop belongs. I anticipate that outside forces, including you, will conspire to change the table setting. Every time that happens, I’m going to move everything back to the way it should be. That’s the constant aspect. I’ll never re-center the saltshaker in a way that denies you your dignity. That’s the gentle aspect. But standards are standards, and I’m constantly watching every table and pushing back on every saltshaker that’s moved because excellent performance is paramount. That’s the pressure.”

Over time, organizations and employees will take on the essence of its leadership, but how can teams represent the philosophy of its organization if the attitude, culture, and processes are not continually reinforced? Organizations whose teams are not trained and coached in its own unique approach to the imperatives of innovation are destined to amass a litany of failed projects. Proper hiring, training and coaching is essential to finding and keeping the right people for the right job, and having them trained in their role in order to perform their personal best.

According to Amy Cosper, Editor and Chief for Entrepreneur Magazine, “leadership is your contribution and your service to your company. It’s your survival, and that of those you lead”.

Training and coaching doesn’t just stop after the initial phase. Continuity is key. New techniques, processes and best practices should always be shared to foster a constant culture of Innovation. Even the trainers and coaches themselves need ongoing training and coaching to prevent their practices from going stale. This is especially true when attracting new talent from Millennial talent pools. Sustained Innovation is a constantly evolving process, and as a leader you help to spearhead the process.

To reinforce and enhance a creative company culture and mindset, effective training and coaching must not be forgotten. Any company that wants to stay in business needs a sustainable Innovation program. Here are some Training and Coaching tips to help your product development process:

  • Share the Joy: As well as the frustrations – communicate what is working and not working.
  • Pick the Right Coaches: Not everyone has the psychological makeup to be the coach.  Knowledge is key, obviously.  But the coach needs to be able to motivate, mediate, and create camaraderie and a sense of selflessness.
  • The One-On-One Touch: Individual coaching provides the privacy and attention that breeds success.  I’ve found that discussions regarding areas for improvement are received and acted upon much better in a private session, away from peers listening in.  This can be especially critical with new employees and/or team members.
  • Basics First: Make certain project management basics are taught, applied and re-taught.

To get results in Innovation, a structured, repeatable process is essential from start to finish. Look to all the imperatives of Robert’s Rules of Innovation – but be sure you know how to implement them. – See more at: http://www.robertsrulesofinnovation.com

How Does Your Company Match Up to the GE Innovation Barometer?

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The GE Global Innovation Barometer conducts annual surveys to put a finger on the pulse of innovation around the world. The survey was conducted earlier this year with over 3,200 high level business executives from over 26 countries participating. The executives surveyed are those chiefly responsible for their company’s innovation development.   This year’s survey touched on 5 key points. It comes as no surprise that many of these points reiterate Robert’s Rules of Innovation®, the imperative on how to Create and Sustain Innovation.

Disruption Ready: Two-thirds polled believe that they must disrupt their internal processes in order to search for the “new kind of talents, technologies and partners”, they need for innovation success. What does this come down to?  Sometimes, you have to shake things up to create innovation.  Robert’s Rule of NO RISK NO INNOVATION reminds organizations to embrace the possibility of failure, and encourage well-reasoned risk taking. See Failure as a learning experience!

Champions of organizational Innovation must have, and encourage, a tolerance for failure and enthusiasm for risk taking. Risk requires investment (people, time, capital), and willingness to invest without ROI assurance.

Collaboration – In 2013 only 38% of executives felt that collaboration with other parties would be successful.  Many executives feared the backlash of collaboration concerning the protection of intellectual property.  However in 2014, 77% of innovation executives felt that the risk was worth taking.

OBSERVE AND MEASURE; Make sure objectives and reward systems are aligned to get the collaboration that is needed.

IDEA MANAGEMENT is about ideation, also known as the idea management process. Much of the focus of this imperative is how to break down silo’s and pack the front end of innovation with a ample ideas waiting in the hopper. Diverse internal teams fuel ideation, but companies should also consider breaking down the walls around their organization to co-create and collaborate with outside parties.

Big Data – 69% of executives that use “big data” feel that it adds value to the innovation process.  What gets measured gets done” in Robert’s Rules of Innovation OBSERVE AND MEASURE.

When creating innovation, it is vital to set metric goals and track these metrics. Observation and measurement – in terms of the performance of the program implementation needs to be built-in as a recurring element. Look for Leading and Lagging indicators, not just lagging!

Future Talent – The importance of talent is a priority among executives, up 6 points to 79% over last year.  INSPIRE AND INITIATE, one of Robert’s Rules of Innovation enforces the idea that management champions of innovation can create inspiring work environments.  Employers that inspire and initiate can retain current talent and will be attractive to future talent.  REWARD, Innovation is all about ROI but make sure employees get recognized and rewarded…

External Framework – This follows Robert’s Rules of Innovation – TRAINING AND COACHING. Innovation executives are often the facilitator of change, and the leaders responsible for the development of corporate innovation culture. These innovation leaders are accountable to assemble teams that will lead them to optimal ROI’s.

In addition to alleviating the amount of government red tape that hinders innovation, the barometer shows that executives also desire current and future business needs top be factored into current college curricula.

 

The GE Global Innovation Barometer measures many of the imperatives to Robert’s Rules of Innovation.  Without taking risks, successful innovation cannot be created or sustained.  Innovation leaders must inspire and initiate as a model for current employees to follow and so that future talent can be recruited.  Innovation must be observed and measured to track failures and successes.  Once a successful innovation process is in place, training and coaching becomes a critical factor of sustainable innovation.

You can learn more about the 10 imperatives of Robert’s Rules of Innovation here. Robert Brands is the founder of InnovationCoach.com and the author of “Robert’s Rules of Innovation”: A 10-Step Program for Corporate Survival, with Martin Kleinman, published by Wiley.

Leading for Innovation

Creating a company culture and mindset focused on innovation begins with proper training and coaching from leaders within the organization. From top to bottom, from executives to newcomers, everyone must be included in training and coaching programs. When you develop, support, and educate your workforce, employee engagement soars and innovation becomes reoccurring and sustainable.

 

 

Often organizations will make a plan and assume that it will get them where they need to go. Leaders can and will promote the effort, but unless their people understand the process, the effort will fail. Make sure that project management basics are taught, applied and re-taught. It is also important that best practices get carried out; but in addition, they must be observed, measured, and refreshed in order to work towards industry “next” practices.

Innovation executives are often the facilitator of change, and the leaders responsible for the development of corporate innovation culture. These innovation leaders are accountable to assemble teams that will lead them to optimal ROI’s.

Glenn Llopis writes for Forbes.com and promotes the idea of leading through a lens of continuous survival, renewal and reinvention. “Innovation is not dependent on the participation of high-ranking executives — but on any employee that is a student of the business, knows their customers and their specific needs,” says Llopis. “An effective leader recognizes the importance of embracing differences in people and knows how to connect the dots amongst those differences to get the best outcomes from the team.”

 

To gauge your company’s training and coaching program, ask yourself:

  • Do you coach champions and project leaders?
  • Do you have standardized project management in place?
  • Do you constantly look for new ways to improve your products and processes – even those which are already successful?
  • Do you share best practices among teams?

 

Innovation training will yield a company that collaborates more efficiently, implements new ideas more rigorously, and thinks more creatively. Training and coaching is an incredible instrument to use with your coach and champions, and will ensure that your innovations don’t begin and end with the idea.

For a more in depth look at how to implement effective training and coaching within your company, *see “Robert’s Rules of Innovation: A 10-Step Program for Corporate Survival.”

“Inciting Discovery, Inspiring Change” #CINONY

Earlier this month, Innovation Enterprise held a Chief Innovation Officer Summit in New York City. The Summit brings together innovation leaders from a range of industries to “incite discovery, inspire change & facilitate a cross-pollination of ideas”. Panelists from some of the most innovative companies such as Pfizer, Disney, Sony, and NASA discussed innovation best practices, innovation metrics, and breakthrough strategies.

One topic discussed at the summit was The Premature Extinction of the Chief #Innovation Officer. The chief Innovation officer or CINO is the person who is primarily responsible for managing the process of innovation.

Innovation executives are often the facilitator of change, and the leaders responsible for the development of corporate innovation culture.

Although I am a firm believer that the CEO must take the role of Chief Innovation Officer, in large corporations, it pays to have a CINO that works and drives innovation on a daily basis. Due to the fact that innovation is not always immediately tangible, it is important to continually re-evaluate the role and adapt to change in order to stay relevant.

Every successful business leader knows that innovation in business is essential, but the best way to engineer and sustain it is not always clear.

During the summit Luis Solis, President of Imaginatik highlighted four essential steps/measures to fortify the CINO position. These steps not only affirm the 10 imperatives of innovation as outlined in Robert’s rules of Innovation, but strengthen my resolve that successful innovation requires many different elements to cross the finish line ahead of your competition.

According to Mr. Solis, the best way to ensure that the role of the CINO does not follow that of the CKO is by doing the following:

  • Make Innovation Imperative: Language is crucial. Innovation cannot be an option, it must be a priority.
  • Show the Impact of Innovation: Visible Indicators of success need not only be monetary, your return on innovation can be changes in speed to market, patents, shortened cycles, and other measures. Remember that what gets measured gets done. Look for Leading and Lagging indications of Innovations as written about before.
  • Investment in people and time:  Educate your CFO about investing in innovation, so that you can invest in the people and time needed to make innovation happen. Create a culture around innovation. Educate and inspire.
  • Secure Institutional Trust: Stakeholders in your business must understand that innovation is a shared win. Your corporate culture must also take into account that without risk, there can be no innovation. Use Failure as a Learning opportunity.

You can learn more about the 10 imperatives of Robert’s Rules of Innovation here. Robert Brands is the founder of InnovationCoach.com and the author of “Robert’s Rules of Innovation”: A 10-Step Program for Corporate Survival, with Martin Kleinman, published by Wiley.

 

Training and coaching for game-changing innovation

Innovate or die. Game changing innovation is hard. It is not simply the outcome of great ideas, but managing a holistic approach to innovate from start to finish.

Every successful business leader knows that innovation in business is essential, but the best way to engineer and sustain it is not always clear. Consider kick-starting your innovation effort with an innovation training workshop such as “Innovate to Thrive” by Brands & Company.  Innovate to Thrive helps leaders deliver profitable growth through sustained innovation by applying Robert’s Rules of Innovation™ to create and sustain “new” in business.

 

Innovation training will yield a company that collaborates more efficiently, implements new ideas more rigorously, and thinks more creatively. Proper training and coaching in the new product development process is essential and the way to create, reinforce and enhanced company culture and mindset.

It is not without  reason that Whirlpool Corp. considers Innovation Training & Coaching the key imperative to create and sustain innovation and the key to long-term success.

Read more about Training and Coaching for Game Changing Innovation Here: http://www.innovationcoach.com/training-coaching-game-changing-innovation.html

Innova(T)ion – Wisdom in Training and Coaching

Why do so many companies falter, even while led by innovation champions and ceo’s that are inspirational, hard-working, smart, driven, and expend major time and effort trying to get it right?

One often forgotten imperative in Robert’s Rules of Innovation ® is TRAINING AND COACHING. Proper training and coaching in the new product development process is essential and the way to create, reinforce and enhanced company culture and mindset.

Proper hiring, training and coaching is essential to finding and keeping the right people for the right job – and having them trained in their role and processes on the NPD team in order to perform their personal best. According to Jeffery Pfeffer in “What were they thinking?,” poor business choices arise when leaders:

  • Fail to consider the unintended consequences of their actions.

For example: When companies get into thick water, the first things to go are usually research budgets, benefits, hours, and even staff. In the short run, this helps cash flow. However, in the long run you have a much higher chance of losing top performing employees and even customers when your quality, service, and innovation are sacrificed.

  • Rely on naieve theories of human behavior.

Many of the key reasons for derailed innovation programs tie back to culture, and to people related issues. Many executives fall prey to the idea that if you want employees to do their jobs well, you have to actively manage them and impel them by financial rewards or even threats. In reality, people have more than one motivating force, which is important to understand in order to achieve optimal performance. Financial rewards are always nice, but for some creative folks, recognition may be an even more powerful driver.

  • Ignore obvious answers

As Pfeffer says in his book, “Many principals governing organizational behavior are simple and powerful – but companies fail to capitalize on them”. One such example is managers that over multi-task while engaging in face time with their employees. Executives that arrive late to meetings, read emails during conferences, or looking through papers as they talk to employees, send a strong message that the employee, or the reason for the meeting is simply not as high priority as they next email or phone call.

 

Here are some Training and Coaching tips to help your product development process:

  • Over-Communicate – One big corporate myth repeated time and time again, is that over-communication is somehow unhelpful, or ineffective. I am convinced that you can almost never over-communicate. Share the good and the bad. Communicate what is working and not working.
  • The One-On-One Touch: Individual coaching provides the privacy and attention that breeds success.  I’ve found that discussions regarding areas for improvement are received and acted upon much better in a private session, away from peers listening in.  This can be especially critical with new employees and/or team members. When you are in a meeting, make that your priority. Treat your employees with courtesy and respect and you will earn their loyalty. Identify and support mentors and champions.
  • Basics First: Persistence Pays. Train for continues improvement and don’t forget to train the new comers. Make certain project management basics are taught, applied and re-taught.

For more information about Training and Coaching for sustainable innovation, see “Robert’s Rules of Innovation” by Wiley, March, 2010.

 

 

Innovation Leadership Re-invented.

Innovation is constantly taking place around us, from the mundane and simple, to the abstract and grand. Last night I was watching a video for Samsung’s newest screen prototype, the oled bendable plastic screen under the Youm brand name.

This morning I am sitting in a coffee shop using webbeams – free Wi-Fi provided with coffee drinker’s in mind. I especially love the language used on webbeams website. “Serious Coffee, Serious Wi-Fi. You have things to do and coffee to drink. The last thing you need is sad, sluggish, unresponsive Wi-Fi. Our Wi-Fi is always in a good mood, fast and reliable, so you can enjoy your drink while you do what you need to do.”

Today, reading this, I am reminded of the importance of creatives in business. By “creatives” I am referring to the highly charged creative people, who are often the source of truly momentous innovation breakthroughs.

 

How does your company foster innovation excellence?

Read more at:  http://www.innovationcoach.com/2013/03/innovation-leadership-re-invented/

 

3 Strategies for Efficient and Effective Teamwork

 

You’ve just asked your employees to collaborate on an important group project. After taking time to photocopy a stack of handouts about the project, the group waits for a conference room to become available.

Finally seated around the table, the group stares down at their paperwork until the meeting disperses, not to meet again for days or weeks. At its bare essentials, the group project appears to be tedious and inefficient. But, by making a few simple changes, you can promote a creative and results-oriented teamwork process. We say, out with the rickety copiers and cubicles and in with efficient technology for easy and effective collaboration.

Save Time with Scheduling

If multiple groups and projects are using a single conference room or other space, put a room scheduling system in place so that everyone has an equal opportunity to utilize the space. Less time is wasted waiting for the room to become available and more time is devoted to getting work done.

  • If conference rooms are unavailable, consider using portable office partitions to temporarily sequester a part of the office for group work. You don’t have to permanently re-design the entire office; it takes little effort making the setup more flexible and conducive to a group environment.
  • Groups work better when they have a dedicated space to regularly meet. As an added bonus, the freedom to leave meeting notes, work samples, and project ideas in the space can “help teammates maintain a shared project mindset,” according to HBR.org.

Save Money with Technology

With the right technology in your office, you can increase group creativity, cost effectiveness, and productivity. Printing presentations and photocopying enough for the group costs time and money and creates waste. Using a projector to display a power point or presentation saves trees and changes the atmosphere of the meeting.

  • Projectors come in a wide variety of types and prices, from low-end laptop peripherals to high-end ceiling-mounted units. Choose the type that best fits the needs of your office, and it will pay for itself in increased productivity and efficiency.
  • With a projector in use, team members focus together on a single point of attention, emphasizing the collaborative nature of the project.
  • With the entire team focusing on the same information, questions and discussions quickly result. Discussing the presentation as a group “enhances the learning experience,” says one expert from E-How.com.

Promote Sharing with Software

Team members need to keep collaborating after the meeting is over. Tens or hundreds of documents and files can be emailed back and forth amongst members as changes are made, resulting in frustration and confusion over which file is the “right” one. Document sharing software keeps inboxes organized and final products safe.

Many document sharing programs are available for free and can be easily downloaded to your computer.

  • If already using Google, you can take advantage of their free Google Drive. In addition to sharing amongst a large group, Google Drive includes free file editing software. Group members can read and real-time edit files at the same time from different computers with no confusion over finding the “final version.”

When it comes to teamwork, it’s out with the old and in with the new. With the right tools and attitude, you can make employee teamwork more productive, creative, and easier than ever.

Megan Webb-Morgan is a web content writer for Resource Nation. She writes about small business, focusing on topics such as VoIP providers.